Functional Anatomy of Movement: An Illustrated Guide to Joint Movement, Soft Tissue Control, and Myofascial Anatomy-- For yoga teachers, pilates instructors & movement & manual therapists (Paperback)

Functional Anatomy of Movement: An Illustrated Guide to Joint Movement, Soft Tissue Control, and Myofascial Anatomy-- For yoga teachers, pilates instructors & movement & manual therapists By James Earls Cover Image
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Description


A unique and comprehensive approach to functional anatomy through the lens of myofascial continuities, from the coauthor of Fascial Release for Structural Balance

Whether we describe them as anatomy trains, myofascial chains, meridians, or slings—insights into the interconnected nature of fascial tissue have had a profound impact on our understanding of anatomy.

The concept of tensegrity—the idea that changes in tension may affect the whole body rather than just one part—has likewise opened up new appreciations for the complex and interdependent nature of real-world bodily movements. But musculoskeletal anatomy still tends to be taught in a drastically simplified fashion, through the study of fixed anatomical positions that do little to prepare us for the reality of actual movements. 

In Functional Myofascial Anatomy, James Earls suggests that we need a new set of tools and vocabulary for watching and describing anatomy in motion. Earls argues that it is seeing movement in action—in different bodies and in different environments—that should inform our understanding of anatomy, rather than the other way around.

By situating the different theories and metaphors of myofascial continuities against the context of common real-life movements such as sports exercises and yoga asanas, Earls explains how each theoretical system may be useful in different situations and applicable to different issues. 

Using up-to-date research, Earls digs into important questions for physical and manual therapists: which tissues really are contiguous? Does continuity of tissue actually show or demonstrate transmission of force and communication along those lines? And does fascial tissue have to be continuous for the body to actually transfer force?

Accessibly written and fully illustrated, Functional Myofascial Anatomy offers practical applications for physical therapists, chiropractors, and bodyworkers, as well as new tools for teachers of yoga and pilates to develop a deeper understanding of anatomy and movement.

About the Author


JAMES EARLS, MSc, is a writer, lecturer, and bodywork practitioner specializing in functional movement and structural integration. He is the director of Born to Move, an education platform teaching real-life anatomy for movement and manual therapists, and he is a popular presenter at conferences and workshops around the world. He is active in several organizations, including the International Association of Structural Integrators, the Sports Massage Association (UK), the Institute of Sports and Remedial Massage (UK), and the Association of Physical and Natural Therapists. Earls also writes regularly for professional magazines and journals, such as Massage World and Today’s Therapist. He’s also been published in In Touch, the magazine for physiotherapists in private practice, and has collaborated with many authors in the production of their titles. Earls is the author of Born To Walk: Myofascial Efficiency and the Body in Movement and the coauthor, with Thomas Myers, of Fascial Release for Structural Balance.


Product Details
ISBN: 9781623178413
ISBN-10: 162317841X
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
Publication Date: December 12th, 2023
Pages: 160
Language: English