Seward Park

Located in the former Seward Park PCC, Third Place Seward Park is a general-interest bookstore featuring new and used books with a used-book buying counter open seven days a week. Third Place Seward Park continues the Third Place mission of providing a gathering space for its new community.

Third Place is also proud to present our partner at the new location - Raconteur. A new restaurant concept brought to you by the owners of Flying Squirrel Pizza. Raconteur will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week. Featuring a full coffee bar with locally roasted espresso, a dining room and a full bar, Raconteur aims to be the neighborhood destination, not only for the Seward Park area, but for all of Seattle. Raconteur’s menu focuses on food from our corner of the world and dishes from around the globe - a truly upscale, international dining experience.

The store features:

  • 15 to 20,000 titles
  • an event/reading space
  • a separate children's department
  • an espresso bar
  • a full restaurant
  • and a full bar

Here's an article about the store that appeared in The Seattle Times.

Latest Staff Picks

The follow-up to Outline is an even more satisfying exposition of a woman’s rich interior life; it is a fascinating, subdued illumination of the mundane’s transformation into profundity when examined in the right light.

The main pleasure in Cusk’s cycle of novels is their meditative effect. Like a mindfulness exercise disguised as fiction, their palliative energy make them necessary reading.

Picked by Wesley

I've probably read Cannibal three times through by now, but still manage to glean something new with each reading. Sinclair has opened my empathy to a culture that is otherwise inaccessible to me, boldly challenging xenophobia with vibrant and unapologetically heavy imagery.

Sinclair is a classic-in-waiting and I cannot wait for the day she is taught alongside Maya Angelou and James Baldwin.

Picked by Avery

The events that inspired Human Acts took place more than two decades ago, but still sits uncomfortably close to home. Han Kang's third translated novel holds nothing back in this fictional retelling of the 1980 Gwangju Uprising in S. Korea that lead to a massacre of hundreds of civilian protesters in an attempt to suppress civil unrest in the city, and of the aftermath in which future generations are almost blissfully unaware of the atrocities that occurred just 20 years prior.
 
This wasn't an easy book to stomach, but an absolutely necessary read, especially given these times when history seems insistent on repeating itself.

Picked by Avery

Moving at such a deliberate, languid pace and voiced by a character easily accused of insouciance, it is all too easy to overlook the book and protagonist's incisive wit and keen social perception. Like Don Quixote translated by Joy Williams, Batuman's debut novel is a distinct reading pleasure, startling and soothing in equal measure.

Picked by Wesley

Abstruse humor and atmospheric capriciousness are the name of the game in Howard's first novel. What the book may lack in traditional narrative is mollified by the protagonist's amiable relationship with the story's almost ceaseless peculiarity (a compliment, to be sure).

It had me in its misty, aimless thrall for its duration and won't be forgotten any time soon.

Picked by Wesley

Those vague, errant anxieties which plague and paralyze us, strengthened by subjectivity's inability to aptly describe them, are painted in precise, vivid colors in Lacey's debut novel. Our heroine, floundering (literally and figuratively) through New Zealand with mostly just her perturbation to keep her company, is as mysterious and fascinating as the landscape.

 

Picked by Wesley

A stunning debut pioneering in its accurate portrayal of a first generation Chinese immigrant family (refreshingly free of stereotypes) and the pressure of the expectations, both societal and familial, forced upon them in a contradiction of identity. Within the first page, I was drawn to Fu's lyrical writing and vibrant characters that gradually intertwined with quiet brilliance and wit.
 
Fu explores the debacle of what life is when constricted to a suffocating outlook of self-denial - what are we willing to sacrifice and suffer though in order for a few sparing moments of authenticity and the happiness it brings? Is complacency all we can accept when faced with overwhelming fear?
 
All in all, an essential and engrossing read from an author whose further works I will be keeping an eye out for.

Picked by Avery

It's hard to grasp just how important the public hospital system is until you read a book like "Bellevue". I was already in awe after reading about them implementing the country's first ambulance service, but as I read about their staff's utterly selfless response during the emergence of the AIDS crisis, my breath caught in my throat. The staff accounts of responding to the September 11th attacks and of hauling buckets of fuel up to the 13th floor emergency generator during hurricane Sandy nearly brought me to my knees.

Picked by Anje

Paul Offit wants people to understand that alternative medicine vs. conventional medicine is a false dichotomy - there is just medicine that works, and medicine that doesn't. In this fascinating overview of the massively lucrative and horrifyingly underregulated alternative health industry, Offit beseeches us to think critically, and provides ample evidence that lives depend on it.

Picked by Anje